Growing Gold Root

Gold Root (scientific name: Heliopsis longipes) comes from an uncommon species of flowering plant belonging to the sunflower family. This plant has only been found in on small region of the world – north-central Mexico.  Found in the states of Guanajuato, San Luis Potosí, and Querétaro, this temperamental plant exists nowhere else.

People have tried to cultivate it elsewhere without success. Some attempts yielded lower potency, while others failed entirely. This sensitive plant is much like wine in that it requires a semi-arid climate with good drainage and cool winds that bring in fog and morning dew in order to thrive.

Grower for Gold Root Nasal Spray uses organically grown Gold Root in their product.

Grower for Gold Root Nasal Spray uses organically grown Gold Root in their product.

Gold Root has an unusually long growing time, approximately 3 years to achieve maximum strength, and for having such a long growing period renders a small yield.  For this reason many growers harvest early, reducing the potency significantly and causing unpleasant foam to appear. This bitter foam is a sign the plant was immature at the time of harvest.

Another common shortcut used by impatient growers is to include the whole plant in their products, rather than the pure root, as their products claim. By using the whole plant, producers triple their yield. However, they reduce purity by two-thirds. Additionally, tap water instead of purified water may be used in some cases. Some growers subject their plants to chemical fertilizers and products to increase yield as well.

Mittie Roger

Mittie Roger has been blogging for 5 years; her blog focuses on off the beaten path travel in the Americas. Both a blogger and a social media consultant, Mittie works with writers, brands, and artists of many mediums. Her first book of short stories, Aurora, was published in December of 2013 after its title story, “Aurora”, received second place in the 2012 Richard Bausch contest. Her fiction has also appeared in Our Stories and Monkey Puzzle Literary Magazine and her non-fiction has appeared in Land Rover Magazine, Land Rover Monthly and Fuse. Her most recent publication, These Boots Are Made for Walking: Travel Journal and Workbook, uses creative prompts to get you thinking differently, traveling more and experiencing life.

 

Gold Root: Analgesic

Gold Root, a widely unknown yet potent root used by indigenous people of central Mexico, has analgesic properties, among others. Many Aztec people used Gold Root, whether chewing it, putting it into their food, or making extracts, to reduce or eliminate discomfort in the mouth, throat or stomach with this numbing agent. Later scientific studies have provided proof for this belief, revealing an interesting alternative cure for mild pain relief.

An analgesic, or painkiller, is a substance that causes a reprieve from pain. Gold Root causes a light, numbing sensation when chewed or placed in the mouth. The numbing sensation is helpful with sore throat, nasal drip from allergies and/or colds and toothaches. Even in the sinuses themselves, a nasal spray will reduce discomfort from congestion.

The first scientific study was done on Gold Root in1953, later printed in the Eddy N.B. Journal Pharmacology 107 (pages 385-393). The findings confirmed its analgesic properties. Recently, in 2007 and 2010, more studies were conducted, providing more support for the identification of Heliopsis Longipes as a pain reliever. The 2007 study, conducted by M. Rios, was published in Ethnopharmacology 110 (2) (pages 264-267). It confirmed the original study’s findings and described the root’s numbing property. The 2010 findings, published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology 130 (pages 216-221) by Carino-Cortez, found that it was not only analgesic but also anti-inflammatory.

These two properties together make the pain relief more effective, reducing the inflammation that often causes the pain. For allergies and colds, this combination of numbing sensation and reducing inflammation in the sinuses and glands can make for effective relief. 

Mittie Roger

Mittie Roger has been blogging for 5 years; her blog focuses on off the beaten path travel in the Americas. Both a blogger and a social media consultant, Mittie works with writers, brands, and artists of many mediums. Her first book of short stories, Aurora, was published in December of 2013 after its title story, “Aurora”, received second place in the 2012 Richard Bausch contest. Her fiction has also appeared in Our Stories and Monkey Puzzle Literary Magazine and her non-fiction has appeared in Land Rover Magazine, Land Rover Monthly and Fuse. Her most recent publication, These Boots Are Made for Walking: Travel Journal and Workbook, uses creative prompts to get you thinking differently, traveling more and experiencing life.

 

Benefits of Gold Root

Most people aren’t familiar with this amazing root since it only grows in a small region of central Mexico, namely Guanajuato, and its borders with Queretaro and San Luis Potosi. Antibacterial, analgesic, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory, this plant has many uses. The most common uses include alleviating sinus congestion and sore throat from allergies, cold or flu, and toothaches. It numbs pain and simultaneously boosts the immune system with its wealth of alkamides, the active ingredient in Echinacea.

The Aztecs have long revered the powerful healing properties of this root, using it in medicine as far back as the 7th century. The root was traditionally chewed, producing a numbing effect on the tongue, teeth and throat. Its antibiotic properties helped to heal a myriad of infections related to the sinuses, throat, mouth, stomach and even the skin. As a powerful microbial, the Aztecs used it to fight everything from athlete’s foot to Candida. Additionally, Gold Root is a pain reliever, disinfectant, and anesthetic. Frequently employed by Aztec mothers to soothe teething babies, the root works well for any type of tooth pain.

Gold Root is also used as a condiment in many indigenous recipes for food and alcoholic beverages, not only for its spicy flavor but also for its detoxifying properties. Consuming Gold Root stimulates the glands, resulting in detoxification through sweat, urine and saliva production. Saliva production can have many beneficial effects including producuing my digestive enzymes, amylase and lipase, which helps neutralize pH in the stomach and mouth. It produces endorphins and reduces effect of acid reflux and stomach pain.

Most effective is its effect on the sinuses. An effective decongestant, it opens the airways and causes an expulsion of mucous from the membranes, easing breathing by reducing inflammation and expelling mucous. For this and the numerous aforementioned reasons, Gold Root was considered a powerful natural medicine in the region where it is found.

Mittie Roger

Mittie Roger has been blogging for 5 years; her blog focuses on off the beaten path travel in the Americas. Both a blogger and a social media consultant, Mittie works with writers, brands, and artists of many mediums. Her first book of short stories, Aurora, was published in December of 2013 after its title story, “Aurora”, received second place in the 2012 Richard Bausch contest. Her fiction has also appeared in Our Stories and Monkey Puzzle Literary Magazine and her non-fiction has appeared in Land Rover Magazine, Land Rover Monthly and Fuse. Her most recent publication, These Boots Are Made for Walking: Travel Journal and Workbook, uses creative prompts to get you thinking differently, traveling more and experiencing life.

 

Welcome to Gold Root Blog!

Welcome!

If you've stumbled across our blog you must be interested in Gold Root, and you're in luck, because this blog is designed to inform about just that. 

Gold Root, known in its country of origin as Chilcuague, is the root of the Heliopsis longipes plant -  a rare species of the sunflower family. It has been found only in the States of Guanajuato, San Luis Potosí, and Querétaro in north-central Mexico.

It's hailed to its healing effects in oral hygiene, tooth whitening, toothaches, sore throat, cold and flu, sinuses. It numbs pain and simultaneously boosts the immune system with its wealth of alkamides (the active ingredient in Echinacea).

Stay tuned for more information about the history, indigenous uses and benefits of this wonderful root.

Mittie Roger

Mittie Roger has been blogging for 5 years; her blog focuses on off the beaten path travel in the Americas. Both a blogger and a social media consultant, Mittie works with writers, brands, and artists of many mediums. Her first book of short stories, Aurora, was published in December of 2013 after its title story, “Aurora”, received second place in the 2012 Richard Bausch contest. Her fiction has also appeared in Our Stories and Monkey Puzzle Literary Magazine and her non-fiction has appeared in Land Rover Magazine, Land Rover Monthly and Fuse. Her most recent publication, These Boots Are Made for Walking: Travel Journal and Workbook, uses creative prompts to get you thinking differently, traveling more and experiencing life.